Home Advice for Parents & CarersMaternity Leave How to give notice for maternity leave and pay

How to give notice for maternity leave and pay

Last updated: 1 Apr 2021

To take maternity leave you must give your employer notice before the end of the 15th week before your baby is due.

If your employer asks you to, you must put the notice in writing. You must tell your employer that you are pregnant, your estimated due date, and the date you wish to start your maternity leave. You will also need to provide your MATB1 certificate, which will be given to you by your midwife or GP once you are 20 weeks pregnant.

Your employer should assume that you will take the full 52 weeks of maternity leave, unless you tell them otherwise.  Your employer must write to you within 28 days of receipt of your notice, and state the date your maternity leave will end.

Most women give notice for Statutory Maternity Pay (SMP) at the same time as notice for maternity leave. Notice for SMP must be given 28 days before the date you want your SMP to start.

We have a sample letter you can use to give notice for maternity leave and SMP.

If you and/or your partner wish to take Shared Parental Leave (SPL), it is worth considering whether to start the notice process for this before maternity leave.

If you change your mind and want to change the start date of your maternity leave, you must give your employer at least 28 days’ notice before the date you originally intended to start your leave, or 28 days’ notice before the new date, whichever is the earlier (in some cases, a shorter period of notice can be given if 28 days is not reasonably practicable).


This advice applies in England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland. If you live in another part of the UK, the law may differ. Please call our helpline for more details

If you have further questions and would like to contact our advice team please use our advice contact form below or call us.

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The information on the law contained on this site is provided free of charge and does not, and is not intended to, amount to legal advice to any person on a specific case or matter. If you are not a solicitor, you are advised to obtain specific legal advice about your case or matter and not to rely solely on this information. Law and guidance is changing regularly in this area.