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Home Advice for Parents & CarersCoronavirus (COVID-19) Coronavirus (COVID-19) – Furlough

Coronavirus (COVID-19) – Furlough

Last updated 5 June 2020.

*PLEASE FOLLOW ANY GOVERNMENT GUIDANCE, AS GUIDANCE ON THE CORONAVIRUS (COVID-19) IS CHANGING DAILY*

Important information on furlough:

The government has announced that the furlough scheme will close to new applicants on 30 June, and that workers must have been furloughed for three full weeks at this point to be eligible for furlough. This means that the latest you can be furloughed for the first time is 10 June.

If you think you may need to be furloughed, and you have not been furloughed before, you should speak to your employer as soon as possible about being furloughed ahead of the 10 June deadline. 

This article covers FAQs about the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (furlough). If you are currently on furlough but have been asked to go back to work, see our Return to work and health and safety page.

You might also want to look at our new pages on:

This page is only relevant for employees and workers. If you are self-employed, have a look at our page on financial support instead.

What is furlough? Who is it for?

What is the coronavirus job retention scheme? What is ‘furlough’?

The Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme is a temporary scheme open to all UK employers and will be running, in some capacity, until October. It is designed to support employers whose operations have been affected by the health, social and economic emergency in the UK caused by coronavirus.

Your employer can claim for 80% of your wages, up to £2,500 a month, plus the associated Employer National Insurance contributions and minimum automatic enrolment employer pension contributions on your wages. 

From 1 July, furloughed employees can return to work part-time, and their employers can continue to claim for any of their hours not worked. If you  are unable to work, or your employer does not have work for you to do, your employer can continue to claim the grant for your full hours under the existing scheme.

Your employer can choose to top up the extra 20% of your salary, but they do not have to. See the question below, ‘Am I entitled to receive 100% of my pay while I’m on furlough?’

Your employer can claim for you if you were on their PAYE payroll on or before 19 March 2020. Your employer also has to have notified HMRC via an RTI submission that you were on their payroll on or before 19 March 2020.

The furlough scheme will close to new entrants from 30 June. From this point onwards, employers can only furlough employees who have been on furlough for a full 3 week period before the 30 June. This means that the final date by which you can be furloughed for the first time is 10 June.

If you agree with your employer that they will apply to cover 80% of your wages through the coronavirus job retention scheme, you will be ‘put on furlough’. This means you remain on your employers payroll, but you cannot carry out any further work for them. Employees that have been ‘furloughed’ have the same rights as they did previously. That includes maternity rights, other parental rights, rights against unfair dismissal and to redundancy payments. 

If you agree with your employer that you will be furloughed, make sure to get confirmation of this in writing. Government guidance for employers says that they must confirm with you in writing that you have been furloughed. To avoid any confusion arising in the future, it would be ideal if you could agree, in writing:

  1. that your employer will apply to HMRC on your behalf for the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme; 
  2. when your employer will apply to the scheme for you;
  3. how long you will be furloughed for (this can be extended by agreement); and
  4. the exact amount of money that your employer will be applying to the government for on your behalf (i.e. how are they calculating your ‘wages’? This point is especially important if your income varies from month to month).

The written agreement does not have to be very formal – you can confirm this via email, text, another messaging service, or more formally by a variation to your contract. It’s just important that it is written down so you can more easily rely on this information in the future if any disagreement arises. 

You can find more information on the government guidance for employees and guidance for employers. 

Is there anything I should watch out for if my employer agrees to put me on furlough?

If you agree with your employer that you will be furloughed, make sure to get confirmation of this in writing. Government guidance for employers says that they must confirm with you in writing that you have been furloughed. To avoid any confusion arising in the future, it would be ideal if you could agree, in writing:

  1. that your employer will apply to HMRC on your behalf for the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme;
  2. when your employer will apply to the scheme for you;
  3. how long you will be furloughed for (this can be extended by agreement); and
  4. the exact amount of money that your employer will be applying to the government for on your behalf (i.e. how are they calculating your ‘wages’? This point is especially important if your income varies from month to month).

The written agreement does not have to be very formal – you can confirm this via email, text, another messaging service, or more formally by a variation to your contract. It’s just important that it is written down so you can more easily rely on this information in the future if any disagreement arises. 

You can find more information on the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme on the government guidance for employees and guidance for employers. 

I am an agency worker, can I benefit from the furlough scheme?

Yes, if you are an agency workers on PAYE then you can be furloughed by the agency, so long as you are not doing any work for them while you are on furlough.

So you can benefit from the furlough scheme, but furlough is not an automatic right. You and (crucially) your employer – the agency – both have to agree to it. It is therefore important to make clear to your employer that furloughing will not have a detrimental impact on them, because they can recover 80% of your wages from the government. They can top up the extra 20% of your wages, but they do not have to. Putting you on furlough will make it much easier for your employer to get their business back up and running smoothly as soon as they can.  

If your employer refuses to furlough you, you may be able to argue that they are discriminating against you. See the question on discrimination below.

Can I ask my employer to apply to the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme if I cannot work from home because of childcare or other caring commitments?

Yes. The government guidance on furlough makes clear that employees can be furloughed if they are unable to work due to childcare commitments. Please see the guidance here.

Remember your employer still has to agree to furlough you. It is therefore important to make clear to your employer that furloughing will not have a detrimental impact on them because they can recover 80% of your wages from the government. They can top up the extra 20% of your wages, but they do not have to. Putting you on furlough will make it much easier for your employer to get their business back up and running smoothly as soon as they can.  

If your employer refuses to furlough you, you may be able to argue that they are discriminating against you, see the question on discrimination below. 

You may also be able to take some other form of leave. See our page on employment rights for more information on taking time off work.

Can I ask my employer to apply to the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme if I cannot work because I am shielding (or need to stay home with someone who is shielding)?

Yes, you can be furloughed if you have to stay at home because you are shielding (or need to stay home with someone who is shielding) and cannot work as a result. 

If you can work from home, you should do so. But if you cannot work from home, and you cannot go into work for shielding reasons, then government guidance says that your employer can apply to the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme to cover 80% of your wages while you are off work. 

Do remember your employer still has to agree to furlough you. It is therefore important to make clear to your employer that furloughing will not have a detrimental impact on them, because they can recover 80% of your wages from the government. They can top up the extra 20% of your wages, but they do not have to. Putting you on furlough will make it much easier for your employer to get their business back up and running smoothly as soon as they can.  

If your employer refuses to furlough you, you may be able to argue that they are discriminating against you, see the question on discrimination below. 

Under new regulations which came into force on 16 April, if you have been told to shield because you are classed as ‘extremely vulnerable’, you are entitled to Statutory Sick Pay (SSP) for the period for which you are unable to work. The government’s guidance on who is ‘extremely vulnerable’ is found here. This does not apply to anyone in your household who is isolating with you (although they can be furloughed). If your employer refuses to furlough you, they should pay you SSP while you are off work. In most cases, it will be better for you financially to be on furlough than on SSP, but this will depend on your current pay and the hours you are working.

You may also be able to take some other form of leave. See our page on employment rights (if you are shielding) or our page for carers (or those living with someone who is shielding) for more information on taking time off work.

I’m on a visa that prevents me from using public funds. Can I use the furlough scheme?

Yes – having no recourse to public funds does not restrict you from using the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme. Government guidance has confirmed that “grants under the scheme are not counted as ‘access to public funds’, and you can furlough employees on all categories of visa.”

So if you are a foreign national and your visa prevents you from claiming public funds, you can still receive 80% of your wages (up to a max of £2,500 per month) through the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme.

I am currently on maternity, adoption, or shared parental leave. Can I cut my leave short to receive furlough pay instead of maternity (or adoption or shared parental) pay?

It is not clear, but according to the existing government guidance, our view is that yes, you should be able to. 

You will need to agree first with your employer that you will be put on furlough: you do not have a right to be put on furlough, this is something that must be agreed.

You normally have to give eight weeks’ notice to return early from maternity (or adoption or shared parental) leave. But an employee and employer can agree between themselves to give a shorter notice period or no notice period at all. However, if you are receiving Maternity Allowance, the government guidance says that you need to give at least 8 weeks’ notice, and that you will not be eligible for furlough pay until the end of that 8 weeks.

Bear in mind that the government has now announced its plans for the next stages of furlough. The furlough scheme will close to new applicants from 30 June, and you must have been on furlough for 3 weeks before this – so if you want to cut your leave short to go on furlough, you will need to start furlough by 10 June. Remember too that from 1 July, employers can ask employees to return to work part-time while on furlough. 

If you cut your maternity, adoption, shared parental leave short to go on furlough, you may therefore have to return to work earlier than planned. But if you still have some maternity (or adoption or shared parental) leave left at the end of the furlough leave, you could go onto Shared Parental Leave (SPL) if you are eligible. You can take SPL until your child is one year old (birth parents) or one year from the date the child was placed with you (for adoption). You can start SPL even if you cut your maternity leave short and returned to work or went on furlough. For more detail on how to take SPL, see our shared parental leave pages.

We also have a dedicated page on rights for new and expecting parents during coronavirus.

I work for a publicly funded employer. Can I be furloughed?

Government guidance says that they do not expect many public sector organisations to use the furlough scheme, partly because most public sector employees are continuing to provide essential public services during the pandemic. Where publicly funded employers continue to receive funding for staff costs, the government expects them to use this money to pay staff as usual, and not to furlough them. There is however nothing saying that publicly funded employers cannot use the scheme at all – only that they are not expected to. The guidance also says that in some limited cases, the furlough scheme may be available to some staff of publicly funded employers.

If your employer has suggested you take unpaid leave but your employer continues to receive public funding for your wages, then you could ask them what they plan to do with that funding – will they be hiring a replacement for you? If not, then your employer will continue to receive public money for your wages, whether or not you are actually working. So there is no harm in asking them to use this money to continue to pay for your salary even though you cannot work anymore (or have to work reduced hours). And remember that it is worth asking your employer to furlough you, even if the guidance is not clear.

You may also want to write to your MP asking for clarity on the rules and why publicly funded employers seem to be ineligible for the furlough scheme, even for their employees that cannot continue working because they have childcare / shielding issues.

Finally, please also contact your union for help if you are a key worker or you work for a publicly funded body, and ask them to push your employer for clarity on this.

During furlough

Can I still work for my employer while I’m on furlough?

No, at the moment you cannot carry out any work for your employer while you are on furlough.

If your employer is asking you to continue working for them, they need to be paying you for this time. They cannot use the scheme to cover your wages if you are working for them. If you’re working your usual hours, you should continue receiving your full pay.

If you are working for your employer on reduced hours, then they cannot apply for this scheme for you. They will need to pay you in line with your usual pay (pro rata in relation to hours worked). 

HMRC announced that they would set up a ‘whistleblowing’ service for workers whose employers are making them work when they are officially on furlough. The whistleblowing scheme allows you to notify HMRC that your employer is breaching the scheme by making you work. You can contact HMRC on their Fraud Reporting line on 0800 788 887 or via their online form. You can also contact Protect, the whistleblowing charity, for advice. There is more information on how to contact them on their website here.

Your employer can still ask you to complete training while you are furloughed. If they do, then they should pay you at least the national minimum wage for the time you are doing the training, even if this means they have to pay you more than the 80% that will be reimbursed by the government.

From 1 July, your employer can ask you to return to work part-time while you are on furlough. If your employer asks you to do this, they must pay you your wages in full for the hours worked. The government will pay 80% of your wages for any of your hours you do not work, until the end of August. See the Chancellor’s announcement on flexible furlough.

Can I work for another employer whilst I am on furlough from my main employer?

Yes, you can work for another employer if your contract allows you to.

The government’s guidance  says that if you are put on furlough you can work for another employer during the furlough but only if your contract allows you to (some employment contracts have exclusivity clause which mean you cannot work for another employer).

Working for this other employer will not affect the grant that the employer who has furloughed you can claim under the scheme.

But you are not allowed to work for an employer or company that is linked to your employer in any way. The work you carry out for the other employer has to be completely separate to the work you normally do. 

Bear in mind also that you will need to be able to return to work for the employer that has placed you on furlough if they decide to stop furloughing you. You must also be able to undertake any training your employer requires you to do while on furlough.

Can my employer ask me to complete training while I’m on furlough?

Yes, your employer can ask you to complete training while you are furloughed. However, according to the government’s guidance, your employer must pay you at least the national minimum wage for the time spent training, even if this is more than the 80% of your salary which is reimbursed by the government.

Can I take annual leave while I’m on furlough?

Yes, the government’s guidance on furlough for employees says that you can take annual leave while you are on furlough.

Your employer will need to top up your salary during this time to ensure you are being paid your full salary while you are on annual leave. This means they will need to pay a top up to the furlough grant provided by the government.

Bear in mind that your employer can restrict when leave is taken if there is a business need.

Will my holidays continue to accrue while I’m on furlough?

Yes, while you are on furlough you continue to accrue annual leave as normal. 

You can agree with your employer to vary holiday pay entitlement as part of your furlough agreement with them, but your employer should not ever lower your holiday pay to below 5.6 weeks (pro rata) per year. This is the minimum amount of paid annual leave set out in the Working Time Regulations.

The government announced on 27 March 2020 that employees who have not taken all of their annual leave due to Coronavirus can carry up to four weeks of leave over into the next two leave years.

Can my employer make me take holiday while I’m on furlough?

Yes, according to government guidance (this applies in England, Scotland and Wales. See here for the position in Northern Ireland). Your employer can require you to take holiday while you are on furlough. They must give you notice of this, and the notice period has to be twice as long as the holiday the employer requires you to take (so if they want you to take a week off, they must give you two weeks’ notice). 

Taking holiday will not disrupt your furlough. However, the government guidance says your employer should consider whether any restrictions you are under might prevent you from resting, relaxing and enjoying leisure time – this is the purpose of holiday. Needing to socially distance from others, or self-isolate, or teach your children while the schools are closed, may prevent you from doing this while you are off work.

Your employer must pay you your full wages while you are taking holiday, even if you have agreed to reduced pay as part of your furlough agreement.

If your employer asks you to take holiday when you don’t want to, you should explain to them why, and ask to save your holiday for another time. You should set out why, in your current circumstances, any holiday taken would not allow you to rest, relax and enjoy leisure time. You could point out to them that the government is allowing employees to carry over up to four weeks of leave into the next two years, because of coronavirus, to give businesses more flexibility. Any holiday which you don’t take now can be taken in the next two leave years.

I am currently on furlough, but my employer has asked me to come back to work. Do I have to return to work?

For questions on returning to work, see our FAQ page here.

Calculating furlough pay

How will my furlough pay be calculated?

Your employer can reclaim 80% of your normal salary back from the government (up to £2,500 per month) while you are on furlough. You may be eligible for your full salary, depending on your circumstances. Your normal salary should be based on your last pay day before 19 March 2020.

If, based on previous guidance, your employer has calculated your furlough pay based on your salary as at 28 February 2020 (and this differs from your last pay period prior to 19 March 2020), they can chose to use the 28 February salary instead. So if your February pay was more beneficial, it’s worth approaching your employer about this.

If your pay varies week by week, your salary will be calculated differently. See the question on variable pay for more guidance.

Am I entitled to receive 100% of my pay while I’m on furlough?

If you are taking holidays or doing training for your employer during your furlough period your employer must pay you your full wages while you are taking holiday or during the training, even if you have agreed to reduced pay as part of your furlough agreement.

If your employer has asked to put you on the furlough scheme, but you are “ready, willing, and able” to work, you have a right to your full contractual pay. Your employer can only recover 80% of your wages (up to £2,500 per month) through the furlough scheme. But the scheme does not change existing employment law. If your employer asks you to go on furlough, you do not have to agree to a reduction in pay – just as you do not have to agree to furlough. If you refuse furlough, your employer may explain that they need to dismiss you or make you redundant. In this situation, it may make more sense to accept 80% of your salary to avoid redundancy. But if your employer wants to make staff redundant, they must follow normal redundancy rules. There will have to be a genuine redundancy situation, and they must follow a fair selection criteria. See our general guidance on redundancy for more information.

If you have asked your employer to put you on furlough because:

  • you cannot continue working for childcare or caring reasons; or 
  • you cannot continue working because you are shielding or someone in your household is shielding,

then it will be more difficult for you to argue that you should be paid your full pay. This is because being entitled to full pay depends on being “ready, willing, and able” to work. If you are furloughed because you have said that you cannot continue working (for childcare, caring, or shielding reasons), you are not ready, willing or able to work. In this case, you may be more inclined to accept a 20% pay cut and receive only 80% of your pay while you are on furlough.

But if you know your employer is paying other members of staff their full salary, you could ask your employer to treat you fairly and in line with your other colleagues. If your employer is topping up furlough wages for some employees and not you because you are not “willing, ready, and able” to work, then you could have an argument for indirect discrimination:

  • If you are furloughed because you have caring responsibilities, and you are a woman, then you may have an argument for indirect sex discrimination. This is because women are more likely to have primary childcare and caring responsibilities, so not topping up wages for employees with caring responsibilities could have a disproportionate impact on the female workforce.
  • If you are furloughed because you are shielding, and you are disabled, then you could have an argument for indirect disability discrimination if your employer refuses to top up your wages just because you are not “ready, willing, and able” to work. This is because such a policy is more likely to affect the disabled workforce (since they are more likely to need to shield).

Before you argue that what your employer is doing is indirect discrimination, it’s really important to bear in mind that an employer can always justify indirect discrimination if they can show that there was a genuine business need for their actions (whereas they cannot justify direct discrimination).

Remember that receiving 80% of your pay is likely to be preferable to redundancy, so you should discuss these points with your employer in an open and friendly manner.

My hours vary week by week. How much furlough pay can I get?

If your pay varies, your employer can claim for the higher of either:

  • the same month’s earnings from the previous year (dependant on when exactly your employer applies for the scheme); or
  • your average monthly earnings from the 2019-20 tax year

If you’ve been employed for less than a year, your employer should claim for an average of your monthly earnings since you started work.

If you have been employed for less than one month, your employer should work out a pro rata for your earnings so far, and claim for 80%. 

If, based on previous guidance, your employer has calculated your furlough pay based on your salary as at 28 February 2020 (and this differs from your last pay period prior to 19 March 2020), they can chose to use the 28 February salary instead. So if your February pay was more beneficial, it’s worth approaching your employer about this.

I am due to return from maternity, paternity, shared parental, adoption leave or sick leave. How will my furlough pay be calculated?

The government guidance for employers states that if an employee returns to work from a period of statutory leave (including maternity leave, paternity leave, shared parental leave, adoption leave, sick leave and parental bereavement leave), then their furlough pay should be calculated against their usual salary, before tax, and not the pay they received whilst on statutory leave.

If your pay varies, then your furlough pay should be calculated using either the:

  • same month’s earning from the previous year; or
  • average monthly earnings for the 2019-2020 tax year.

If you’ve been employed for less than a year, your employer should claim for an average of your monthly earnings since you started work.

I earn the national minimum wage (NMW), so reducing my salary to 80% means I am earning below the NMW. Can my employer do that?

Yes they can. The government have confirmed in their guidance on the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme that because employees are only entitled to the NMW for the hours they actually work, furloughed workers may be paid below this threshold. But if your employer asks you to do some training during the time you are furloughed, then they should pay you at least the NMW for the time you are doing the training, even if this means they have to pay you more than the 80% that will be reimbursed by the government. Remember that you are not supposed to work when you are furloughed but your employer can ask you to complete training.

There are some advantages to agreeing to your employer’s proposal. It will mean you have a continued (though reduced) income for at least three months. The risk is that if you refuse your employer’s proposal, you could be made redundant.

Discrimination and breach of contract

My employer is choosing to put some employees on furlough and not others. Is it discrimination?

It could be discrimination if you are not furloughed just because:

  • You are pregnant (pregnancy discrimination)
  • You are on maternity leave (sex discrimination)
  • You have a disability
  • You are the carer of someone with a disability (direct disability discrimination by association)
  • You work part-time 
  • You are on a fixed term contract
  • Of your sex/gender or another protected characteristic 

Also, if you have taken family-related leave (maternity leave, adoption leave, shared parental leave, paternity leave, parental leave, or time off for dependants) then you have a right not to be treated unfavourably as a result. So if you are not furloughed purely as a result of you taking or intending to take family-related leave then this may be unlawful.

If your employer fails to notify you about the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme just because you are on family-related leave or because of one of the discriminatory reasons above, this could also be a breach of your contract – more specifically, the implied breach of trust and confidence.

My employer hasn’t applied for the furlough scheme even though they agreed I could be furloughed. Is there anything I can do?

The online service for employers to claim the grant that covers furloughing costs (80% of employee wages or salary up to a maximum of £2,500) opened for applications on 20 April 2020. If your employer has agreed to furlough you and has money to be able to continue to pay you as furloughed, they should do so. They can then reclaim these payments through the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme. 

If you agree with your employer that you will be furloughed, make sure to get confirmation of this in writing. Government guidance for employers says that they must confirm with you in writing that you have been furloughed. To avoid any confusion arising in the future, it would be ideal if you could agree, in writing:

  1. that your employer will apply to HMRC on your behalf for the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme; 
  2. when your employer will apply to the scheme for you;
  3. how long you will be furloughed for (this can be extended by agreement); and 
  4. the exact amount of money that your employer will be applying to the government for on your behalf (i.e. how are they calculating your ‘wages’? This point is especially important if your income varies from month to month).

The written agreement does not have to be very formal – you can confirm this via email, text, another messaging service, or more formally by a variation to your contract. It’s just important that it is written down so you can more easily rely on this information in the future if any disagreement arises.

If your employer had agreed to apply to the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme for you, and they later refuse to do so, you may be able to argue that this is a breach of your contractual agreement and potentially unlawful deduction of wages (see below). 

If your employer doesn’t have enough money to continue to pay you whilst waiting for the grant to come through, then you may be able to claim financial support from the government through the benefits system. You can find more information on the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme on the government guidance for employees and guidance for employers.

To see what you may be eligible to claim, please see our page on Coronavirus and financial support.

My employer told me that I’m on furlough, but they have not paid me my furlough pay. What can I do?

Has your employer told you why they have not given you your furlough pay? Are they waiting to receive funds from HMRC? Have they received these funds, but are withholding them from you? Understanding this will help you decide what to do next.

Your first step should be to ask your employer to pay you. If they are still refusing to do so, you should consider the legal arguments below.

Check the written agreement with your employer. When you were furloughed, your employer should have confirmed this in writing. You should check this written confirmation carefully – it may have been a letter, or an email. In it, your employer should say that they will pay you while you are on furlough. You should point this out to your employer. Even if you do not have a written agreement with your employer, they should be paying you while you are on furlough. Their failure to pay you may be a breach of contract. However, even if successful, this claim often only results in a small amount of compensation (probably not more than financial sum you would have received had you been furloughed). Claims for breach of contract cannot be made in an Employment Tribunal unless your employment has ended. You can make a claim for breach of contract in the County Court without leaving your job, but if you do this there is a risk that you will be ordered to pay your employer’s legal fees if you lose the case.

You may also have a claim for unlawful deduction from wages. A “deduction” of wages includes late payment. You do not have to be an employee to bring a claim for unlawful deduction of wages – it also applies to workers. There is no minimum length of time you must have worked for your employer for to bring a claim for unlawful deduction from wages. Bringing a claim for unlawful deduction of wages may be preferable to bringing a claim for breach of contract because you can claim your wages at the Employment Tribunal while still working for your employer. You can only bring a claim for breach of contract at the Employment Tribunal if your employment has ended.

Your employer can argue that the deduction of wages is not unlawful if it is covered in your employment contract, or if you have agreed to the deduction in writing. You should check your employment contract carefully – does it allow your employer to reduce your pay like this? You should also make it clear in your communications with your employer that you do not consent to them withholding your furlough pay.

A claim for unlawful deduction of wages is brought at the Employment Tribunal. If you are considering bringing a claim, you must seek legal advice. There are strict time limits at the Employment Tribunal – you must bring your claim within three months of your employer failing to pay you. If your employer continues to withhold your pay, the 3-month time limit for making a claim could run from the last date on which your employer refused payment.

If you are successful in a claim for unlawful deduction from wages, the Employment Tribunal will order your employer to pay the amount you were supposed to receive. They may also award you an appropriate sum for any financial loss caused by the late payment (for example, overdraft fees).

There is more information about bringing a claim at the Employment Tribunal on our webpages.

If your employer is refusing to pay you on furlough but they are claiming your furlough pay from the government, you can contact HMRC to report this: If you have concerns about whistleblowing, you can contact Protect, a specialist whistleblowing organisation, for advice.

Useful resources

Where can I go for more help?

We have created a number of articles on topics relating to coronavirus. Have a look at our general FAQs page on your rights at work, information about furlough and redundancy, our page on what financial support you might be able to claim, our page for new and expecting parents during the COVID-19 pandemic, and our page on return to work and health and safety.

To find out what government schemes will help if your work has been affected by COVID-19, Child Poverty Action Group (CPAG) have created a decision tree to help you navigate what you may be entitled to, including whether you are eligible to be furloughed.

Links to further resources:

 

This advice applies in England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland. If you live in another part of the UK, the law may differ. 

If you have further questions and would like to contact our advice team please use our advice contact form below or call us.

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