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A Guide to Benefits if you Care for a Disabled Child

Last updated: 5 Jan 2022

If you are responsible for a disabled child, it can be confusing to work out what you are entitled to. This is a guide to benefits you may be able to claim for yourself and your disabled child.

If you are unable to work because you are caring for a disabled child please see our page on benefits whilst on parental leave or after resigning.

If you have questions about your rights at work please see our website section for parents and carers of dependants with a disability.

You can find lots more information on the Contact website. Contact is a charity that specifically supports families with disabled children.

Disability Living Allowance

Disability Living Allowance (DLA) is a benefit to help with the extra costs of looking after a disabled child under 16 years old. In Scotland DLA is being replaced with Child Disability Payment (CDP) – if you have an existing DLA claim and you live in Scotland you will be automatically switched to Child Disability Payment.

If your child is aged 16 or over they will need to claim Personal Independence Payment (PIP) instead of DLA.

You can get DLA if your child has difficulties walking or getting around or if they need supervision or have care needs which are substantially more than most children of their age. You do not need to wait for a formal diagnosis to apply for DLA.

DLA consists of a mobility component and a care component which are paid at different rates. Your child may qualify for only one component or both together. You cannot get the mobility component for a child under three.  There is no age requirement for the care component, but you cannot usually claim it for a baby under three months old. This is because your child must have had care needs or mobility problems for at least three months before they can be entitled to DLA, unless they are terminally ill.

DLA claimed for your child does not depend on your household income or savings. You can claim it regardless of whether you are working or how much you have in savings. You can also move in and out of work without it affecting your child’s eligibility.

DLA is a complex benefit and it can be difficult to claim it for a child. It is advisable to get specialist advice when applying because the claim forms are long. Contact have some tips for completing the form on their website. It can be helpful to keep a diary in the week or month before you complete the form to help you remember all the ways your child’s condition affects them. You may find this sample DLA diary from Citizens Advice helpful for this.

Contact can help you with any questions you have about benefits for a disabled child. Your local Citizens Advice may be able to help fill in forms, or there may be a local disabled persons’ or carers’ organisation which can help. You can search for a local advice organisation on Advice LocalScope may be able to help you find organisations local to you who can help with claim forms.

More about DLA for children is here, or if you are in Northern Ireland, here.

Personal Independence Payment

Personal Independence Payment (PIP) is a benefit to help with the extra costs of disability for people aged 16 to pension age. In Scotland PIP is being replaced with Adult Disability Payment which will start being rolled out in pilot areas from March 2022.

In England, Wales and Northern Ireland, if your child is already getting DLA it won’t automatically stop when they reach 16. The DWP will write and invite them to claim PIP, usually shortly before their 16th birthday. Their DLA will continue until a decision has been made on their PIP claim, provided they claim within the time limit.

In Scotland, your child can remain on DLA until they reach 18, however, they can choose to claim PIP after they turn 16 if they want to. You should get further advice if considering this as they will not be able to go back onto DLA once they claim PIP, even if they are worse off.

Your older child can get PIP if they have difficulties walking or getting around or if they need supervision or care with everyday tasks essential to daily living. This can be due to either a physical or mental health condition.

PIP consists of a mobility component and a daily living (care) component which are paid at different rates. Your older child may qualify for only one component or both together. To be eligible for PIP they must have had mobility problems or difficulty with every day tasks for 3 months and expect it to continue for at least a further 9 months (unless they are terminally ill).

PIP claimed for your older child does not depend on your household income or savings or their own personal income or savings. They can claim it regardless of whether you or they are working or how much you or they have in savings. You or they can also move in and out of work and/or education without it affecting their eligibility.

Your older child can make and manage their own PIP claim if they are capable, or you can claim on their behalf as their appointee if they cannot manage the claim themselves. The process of becoming their appointee does not happen automatically as you will need to show why your older child cannot act for themselves. You can find more information on becoming an appointee on gov.uk.

PIP is a complex benefit and it is advisable to get specialist advice because the claim forms are long. Citizens Advice have a guide to filling in the claim form on their website. It can be helpful to keep a diary in the week or month before you complete the form to help you remember all the ways your child’s condition affects them. You may find this sample PIP diary from Citizens Advice helpful for this.

Contact can help you will any questions you have about benefits for a disabled child. Your local Citizens Advice may be able to help fill in forms, or there may be a local disabled persons’ or carers’ organisation which can help. You can search for a local advice organisation on Advice LocalScope may also be able to help you find organisations local to you who can help with claim forms.

More about PIP is available here, or if you are in Northern Ireland here.

Child Benefit

You can claim Child Benefit for a disabled child but you don’t get any extra because they have a disability. However, you may be entitled to additional amounts of other benefits if your child gets DLA or PIP. 

If your child is over 16, they will have to meet additional conditions for you to carry on getting Child Benefit, to do with being in full-time education. The rules are the same as for children who are not disabled; if your child leaves full-time education, you may no longer be entitled to Child Benefit for them.

You can’t get Child Benefit for a young person who claims Universal Credit (see below). If you are not sure whether a young person should claim Universal Credit or it would be better to continue to claim for them, get advice.

More about Child Benefit is available here.

If you live in Scotland you may also be entitled to a Scottish Child Payment.

Carer’s Allowance

If you are a carer for your disabled child and they get the middle or higher rate care component of DLA, or the daily living component of PIP, you may be able to get Carer’s Allowance. If you are thinking of taking up work you may want to consider the effect it may have on your entitlement to Carer’s Allowance. As a carer, depending on your other circumstances, you may also be entitled to Income Support, but this will usually only apply if you are already getting it.

Universal Credit

If you are on a low income and you are not already claiming Income Support, income-based Jobseeker’s Allowance, income-related Employment and Support Allowance, Housing Benefit or tax credits, you could consider claiming Universal Credit (UC). This is a benefit which will replace those benefits and so if you claim it, they will usually stop. You could end up worse off, so always seek advice. However, if you are not claiming these benefits, UC may be worth claiming. It can include extra amounts for a disabled child who is on DLA or PIP, called a disabled child element.

Over 16s who are not working and would have difficulty working because of illness or disability can claim Universal Credit themselves (see Benefits for disabled adults). However, you can’t claim Child Benefit, or a child element or disabled child element in Child Tax Credit or Universal Credit, in respect of a young person at the same time as they claim UC, so you may need advice about which to claim, or you can research the amounts involved. You can look at the different benefit amounts which would be paid depending on who claims by using an online calculator like the one on the website Turn2Us. Even if your young person claims UC, you can still be their appointee for the benefit, if that is necessary (that means you would be responsible for making the claim and reporting all changes of circumstances).

When your child first claims UC, they will need to submit a medical certificate (evidence that they are not fit for work) and be referred to a work capability assessment. If they are found to have limited capability for work or limited capability for work-related activity they can continue to get UC whilst under 18. If they are found capable of work, it’s worth seeking advice in case this decision can be challenged.

Continuing to claim for your child could be worth more money overall than your child claiming UC, but it depends on all the circumstances, so get advice if you are not sure what you/your child should claim (you could also look at our transition guide). 

Child Tax Credit (CTC)

Child Tax Credit is a benefit for people on low incomes responsible for children. You can normally only get this if you have an existing tax credit claim. You may get more Child Tax Credit if your child gets DLA or PIP, because there is an extra element of Child Tax Credit included in the calculation. Make sure you tell the Tax Credit Office what rate of DLA or PIP your child is getting. If you are making a new claim for Child Tax Credit you will be told to claim Universal Credit instead. You can still get Child Tax Credit added to your claim if you already get Working Tax Credit (this isn’t a new claim).

If your child is over 16, they will have to meet additional conditions for you to carry on getting Child Tax Credit, to do with being in full-time education. The rules are the same as for children who are not disabled; if your child leaves full-time education, you may no longer be entitled to Child Tax Credit for them.

You can’t get Child Tax Credit for a young person who claims UC. If you are not sure whether a young person should claim UC or it would be better to continue to claim for them, get advice.

Working Tax Credit (WTC)

WTC is a benefit for people working a certain amount of hours and on a low income. It is usually only available if you already have a tax credit claim (see Working Tax Credit).  You may also qualify for help with childcare costs within Working Tax Credit (see Childcare element of Working Tax Credit).

If you are making a new claim for tax credits you will be told to claim Universal Credit (UC) instead. However, you can get Working Tax Credit if you already get Child Tax Credit (or vice versa).

Direct Payments (DP)

If your disabled child, having been assessed by your local authority, is entitled to services, you can choose to have direct payments (DP) and buy the services yourself. DP are for the stipulated services and are not affected by what you earn.

Disabled Facilities Grant

If your local authority provides a grant to alter your home to suit your disabled child’s needs it is not affected by your income.

Housing Benefit and Council Tax Reduction

Housing Benefit and Council Tax Reduction (help with the council tax from your local authority) depend on your income. In Northern Ireland, you may be entitled to help with the rates.

These benefits depend on how many dependent children you have and the calculation will be different if your children are on DLA or PIP, so make sure the local authority know about this. In addition, the number of bedrooms allowed for in the Housing Benefit (HB) calculation could be higher if your children are unable to share a room because of disability and they are on DLA or PIP. Again make sure the local authority are aware.

If you make a new claim for Housing Benefit, you will usually be told to claim Universal Credit instead. It can include a housing element to help with the rent, and the same rules about the number of bedrooms apply. You can only make new claims for Housing Benefit in very limited circumstances, such as, if you are in temporary or certain types of supported accommodation. If you are on Housing Benefit and you move to new rented accommodation within the same local authority, you should be able to stay on Housing Benefit as long as there is no gap in your claim.

If you move into work, you may, depending on your income, still be entitled to such help but you need to inform your local authority for the benefits to be recalculated. You can use the calculator at the website www.turn2us.org.uk to check your entitlement.

Family Fund

The Family Fund gives discretionary grants to families with severely disabled children under 18. They have their own definition of ‘severely disabled’. The grants are for things not supplied by statutory authorities. Usually the grants are made to families on benefits, but the fund may also be able to help other families on low incomes.

Help with health costs

You can qualify for help with health costs, for example prescriptions and sight tests, if you receive some benefits such as Income Support, Income-based Jobseeker’s Allowance, Income-related Employment and Support Allowance, or the Guarantee credit of Pension Credit . Some people on Universal Credit or tax credits may be entitled, and you may also be able to apply for help if you are on a low income. Prescriptions are free in England for under 16s, and under 19s in full-time education (as well as for some other groups, such as pregnant women), and they are also free in Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland to everyone.


This advice applies in England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland. If you live in another part of the UK, the law may differ. Please call our helpline for more details.

If you have further questions and would like to contact our advice team please use our advice contact form below or call us.

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The information on the law contained on this site is provided free of charge and does not, and is not intended to, amount to legal advice to any person on a specific case or matter. If you are not a solicitor, you are advised to obtain specific legal advice about your case or matter and not to rely solely on this information. Law and guidance is changing regularly in this area.